Intricate Book Sculptures Give Whole New Meaning to “Wordplay” | My Modern Met


By Arnesia Young on August 2, 2021

We’re putting down the Kindle and picking up one of these books.

Notes from Underground” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

The beauty of written language is often captured within the pages of a book, though few people would consider a book to be a work of art in and of itself. However, for graphic designer Stephen Doyle, each book offers a unique canvas ripe for visual and textual exploration. Doyle’s Hypertexts—a series of intricately altered book sculptures—allow words to leap beyond the page, creating elaborate structures and forms that give a whole new meaning to the term wordplay.

The Waves” by Virginia Woolf

“I love language—and languages,” Doyle tells My Modern Met. “Cutting up books and reconstructing them is not exactly a rational exercise. The way that text is composed in a book is efficient, but not rational either. Lines of text begin mid-sentence, or wherever the last measure cut off, each line a wonderful slender brick, but meaningless out of context in the structure. Reconfiguring these lines creates arbitrary associations, juxtapositions that confuse or delight… Like concrete poetry, I can use language to visualize form, create puzzles, and if successful, they step up to the job of being koans.” […]

Atonement” by Ian McEwan

More: Intricate Book Sculptures Give Whole New Meaning to “Wordplay”

About agogo22

Director of Manchester School of Samba at http://www.sambaman.org.uk
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1 Response to Intricate Book Sculptures Give Whole New Meaning to “Wordplay” | My Modern Met

  1. Pingback: Intricate Book Sculptures Give Whole New Meaning to “Wordplay” | My Modern Met — msamba – Transformations

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