Download 1,000+ Japanese Woodblock Prints by Utagawa Hiroshige | My Modern Met


By Margherita Cole on July 10, 2021

“Cherry Blossoms in Full Bloom at Goten-yama,” c. 1840-42. (Photo: Public domain, via Minneapolis Institute of Art.)

 

You can view and download thousands of woodblock prints created by a master Japanese artist from the Edo period.

 

With rich colors and distinct aesthetics, Japanese woodblock prints blossomed between the 17th and 19th centuries, in the Edo era. During this time, Japan was mostly closed off from the outside world, and only a handful of Dutch and Chinese traders were allowed inside with severe restrictions. So, the style of ukiyo-e, which literally means “pictures of a floating world,” offers a window into what life was like before the country reopened.

“No.7 Fujisawa,” 1847-1852. (Photo: Public domain, via Minneapolis Institute of Art.)

 

Among the many masters of this trade, Utagawa Hiroshige (born Andō Hiroshige) was one of the most influential. Not only was he incredibly prolific, producing more than 8,000 woodblock prints during his lifetime, but he also created some of the best-known images of Japanese life during the Edo era. Some of his most famous series include The Fifty-Three Stations of the Tōkaidō and One Hundred Famous Views of Edo, both of which explored composition and subtle use of color. […]

“Mouth of the Aji River in Settsu Province,” 1858, 7th month. (Photo: Public domain, via Minneapolis Institute of Art.)

More: Download 1,000+ Japanese Woodblock Prints by Utagawa Hiroshige

About agogo22

Director of Manchester School of Samba at http://www.sambaman.org.uk
This entry was posted in Art and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.