Italian photographers document socialist history through post-war Soviet architecture in Georgia | Dezeen


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Roberto Conte and Stefano Perego have captured the architecture and monuments of post-war Soviet Georgia in their latest photography collection.

Conte and Perego took photographs of 12 buildings built after the Second World War, in the country that was part of the Soviet Union from 1922, when it was established, until its fall in 1991.

“What I like about these buildings is their unconventional beauty and powerful impact, and it’s interesting to see how each country of the former Soviet Union developed its own approach to planning and building,” said Perego.

The collection includes a pair of iconic buildings in Georgia’s capital Tbilisi – the former Ministry of Highway Construction (now the headquarters of the Bank of Georgia), built by George Chakhava and Zurab Jalaghania in 1975, and the Palace of Rituals, built by Victor Djorbenadze in the mid 1980s.

“They are a part of the Georgian architectural heritage,” said Conte.

“Before the involvement of international architects in contemporary Tbilisi, local architects managed to design extremely interesting buildings absorbing global and Soviet influences and then merging it with a peculiar local style.”

The collection includes the Ministry of Highway Construction of the Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic. Tbilisi. Photo is by Roberto Conte

Chakhava and Zurab’s geometric creation appealed to the photographers because of its complex shape and unusual position alongside a river.

“The design itself is absolutely astonishing, with a kind of mixture between metabolism, and the horizontal skyscrapers planned by the Soviet and constructivist artist-cum-architect El Lissitzky back in the 1920s,” explained Conte.[…]

A photograph of the Aragveli monument in Zhinvali features in the collection. Photo is by Stefano Perego

More: Italian photographers document socialist history through post-war Soviet architecture in Georgia

About agogo22

Director of Manchester School of Samba at http://www.sambaman.org.uk
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